Threatening Youth Work : The Illusion of Outcomes – IDYW Seminar, June 14, Bolton University

 

IN DEFENCE OF YOUTH WORK IN PARTNERSHIP WITH YOUTH AND COMMUNITY STUDIES, BOLTON UNIVERSITY

ENGAGING CRITICALLY : A SERIES OF WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS

THREATENING YOUTH WORK : THE ILLUSION OF OUTCOMES

FRIDAY, JUNE 14 from 1.30 to 3.30 p.m.

UNIVERSITY OF BOLTON, DEANE CAMPUS, BL3 5AB

Over the coming period In Defence of Youth Work is committed to encouraging an open and pluralist debate about the state of youth work today. In our view there has been a conspicuous lack of collective discussion about the dramatic shifts in the landscape of work with young people. Given youth work’s claim to a reflective and self-critical tradition this is more than a touch ironic.

In the Open Letter, which launched our campaign over four years ago, we declared that “youth workers and managers have been coerced and cajoled into embracing the very antithesis of the Youth Work process: predictable and prescribed outcomes.” Little has changed. Indeed outcomes-led youth work seems to be the norm, a taken-for-granted fact of life. Earlier this year the National Youth Agency and the Local Government Association joined forces to promote A Framework of Outcomes for work with young people. Contradictorily though outcomes-based management and practice is coming under increasing fire across what we used to call public services – in areas such as health, social work, housing and even policing. Increasing evidence illustrates that an outcome-based approach distorts both process and relationships. Its primary objective is the collection of data. People come second.

In this context it is strange that youth work, which has prided itself on the building of relationships and the unfolding of process, should have embraced so uncritically the Outcomes agenda. In the seminar we will first encourage people to share their experiences of working to outcomes – good, bad and indifferent. Afterwards Tony Taylor, Coordinator of the Campaign and in a past life even a Chief Youth and Community Officer, will suggest that the pursuit of outcomes does not produce the ‘robust’ evidence of impact claimed. It is a self-fulfilling illusion, which threatens the survival of youth work as a distinctive young person-centred practice.

After which we should have a lively debate!

To book a place and/or obtain more information, contact Paula Connaughton at P.Connaughton@bolton.ac.uk

APOLOGIES YET AGAIN FOR THE CRUNCHED NATURE OF THIS POST!!

PLEASE CIRCULATE THE FLYER, The Illusion of Outcomes

 

 

 

 

Talking of Young Entrepreneurs and Young Soldiers – CELEB YOUTH blogs

CelebYouth is certainly a web site to follow. In the last week a couple of guest blogs speak to pressing issues in both youth work and the wider sphere of work with young people.

Given the increasing influence of the market on our work and the consequent rise of the young entrepreneur/adviser milieu the first piece, ‘Young Entrepreneurs : money-making for the nation’s benefit’, questions “the assumption that entrepreneurial ambitions are unequivocally good.” The authors, Anita Biressi and Heather Nunn, quote the Peter Jones Foundation’s “campaign to put enterprise at the heart of the education system … it seeks to encourage people to make it in Britain and to live their dream. It does this through inspiring excellence through a network of enterprise academies where passion, self-belief and ‘go-getting’ attitudes are nurtured.”  Forgive me I didn’t know the said Peter Jones is the multimillionaire backer of the tv programme, Dragons Den, but I do believe this ideology of self-obsessed, possessive individualism is infecting informal as well as formal education.

In the second blog, Hang Out or Shape Up, Laura takes up the theme of the militarisation of education, drawing on her own experience as a cadet. She quotes a revealing comment from Michael Gove.

‘Your son says he wants to spend more time with one particular group of friends. Which would be more inspiring – because he wants to improve his pool or because they’re in the cadets and he wants to join?’

She ends by suggesting that

“Gove’s rhetoric shows that the government’s interest in cadet forces isn’t about ‘opportunities’. By focusing on the ‘need’ for military discipline in ‘failing’ schools and among ‘failing’ youth, Gove reinforces his attack on teachers and young people as ‘deficient’, directing attention away from the heavy impact of cuts to youth services and welfare, and presenting his vision of education as a place where young people learn to be compliant, rather than critical, members of society.”

Celebration of Community and Youth Work in Manchester and the North-West as the Manchester University course sadly disappears

For those of us, who have worked many a year in the North-West of England, the closure of the Manchester University Community and Youth Work course is hard to bear. Refusing to be downhearted the staff are organising a Celebration on Tuesday, May 28, details of which are to be found below. Tania de St Croix, a former student at Manchester herself, and Bernard Davies will be contributing to the event on behalf of our campaign. Speaking personally, as a former youth worker and youth officer in Wigan, I would love to be there, although I would bore folk to tears reminiscing about the tribulations and triumphs of the 1970’s and 1980’s.

Get in touch with Martin Purcell if you want to participate.

Martin Purcell

Lecturer, Applied Community and Youth Work Studies

University of Manchester

School of Education

A1.11 Ellen Wilkinson Building

Oxford Road

Manchester M13 9PE

Tel. (0161) 275 5795

www.manchester.ac.uk/

 

Time

Activity

Venue

09.00 – 10.30

Setting up stalls / exhibitions

Ellen Wilkinson AG3/4

10.30 – 12.00

Exhibition of first year students’ work on Community Participation in local community and youth work organisations (to be assessed by ACYWS tutors)

Ellen Wilkinson AG3/4

12.00 – 13.00

Lunch / Networking / Visiting Stalls

Ellen Wilkinson AG3/4, Café and Common Room

13.00 – 15.00

This is Youth Work: Telling & Sharing Stories

IDYW workshop facilitated by Tania de St. Croix; see http://www.indefenceofyouthwork.org.uk/wordpress/?p=3017

Ellen Wilkinson AG3/4, 9 & 11

15.00 – 15.30

Refreshments / Networking / Visiting Stalls

Ellen Wilkinson AG3/4, Café and Common Room

15.30 – 17.00

Campaigning in the era of the Axeman: Choose Youth; In Defence of Youth Work & National Coalition for Independent Action. Discussion facilitated by ACYWS tutors, with input from Bernard Davies, Tania de St. Croix and Ian Richards; see http://www.chooseyouth.org/ ; http://www.indefenceofyouthwork.org.uk/wordpress/; http://www.independentaction.net/.

Ellen Wilkinson AG3/4

16.30 – 18.00

Introductory Community Philosophy Workshop

Facilitated by Martin Purcell and Samira Bakkioui

See http://www.sapere.org.uk/Default.aspx?tabid=102

Ellen Wilkinson AG3/4

18.00 – 19.30

Setting up stalls / exhibitions

International Buffet / Networking / Visiting Stalls

Students’ Union Council Chamber

19.30

Welcome: Kate Sapin & Martin Purcell

Applied Community & Youth Work Studies Programme

19.45

Celebrating youth and creativity: Gorse Hill Studios Dancers

20.15

Celebrating Community Development and Youth Work:

Bernard Davies, National Coalition for Independent Action and In Defence of Youth Work

20.30

Celebrating youth and creativity: Yasmin – Brighter Sound

20.45

Celebrating Community Development and Youth Work:

Summary of CYWU / Unite the Union campaigning; Ian Richards

21.00

Celebrating community and creativity: Reel MCR Film

21.30

Student / Community Performers

23.00

Thanks, End & Depart


Advancing Youth Work : A Transatlantic Conversation with Dana Fusco, June 19

 

IN DEFENCE OF YOUTH WORK

ENGAGING CRITICALLY: A SERIES OF SEMINARS

ADVANCING YOUTH WORK IN TIMES OF AUSTERITY

LOCALLY, NATIONALLY AND INTERNATIONALLY

A TRANSATLANTIC CONVERSATION with DANA FUSCO

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19 FROM 1.30 TO 4.30 P.M.

AT THE UNISON CENTRE, EUSTON ROAD, LONDON

Over the coming period our campaign is committed to encouraging an open and pluralist debate about the state of youth work today. In our view there has been a conspicuous lack of collective discussion about the dramatic shifts in the landscape of work with young people. Given youth work’s claim to a reflective and self-critical tradition this is more than a touch ironic.

We are delighted to embark on this process in the company of Dana Fusco, Professor of Teacher Education at York College of the City University of New York. For the past twenty years her research has focused on youth development and after-school intervention leading to national and international recognition. Fascinatingly, given our own emphasis on story-telling, Dana recently was writing with colleagues on the ‘Squeezing of Youth Voice and Agency during Out-of-School Time’, calling for stories and testimonies. Dana’s most recent work is the acclaimed ‘Advancing Youth Work: Current Trends, Critical Questions’, of which she is editor. And as we write she is seeking contributions for a forthcoming book on Youth Work and Inequality – see our web site for details.

The afternoon will see Dana’s central contribution sandwiched between sharing experiences in small groups, a wider Question and Comment session with an emphasis on building links with each other – across towns, cities, countries and oceans!

As ever with IDYW the cost will be kept low – Unwaged/Students £2, Waged £5. In doing so we are grateful to UNISON for their support in providing the venue.

To book a place, contact Tony at tonymtaylor@gmail.com

Dana Fusco June 19 flyer – please circulate around your networks

APOLOGIES FOR THIS POST BEING CRUSHED!! WILL TRY TO SORT OUT LATER!

 

UNITE highlights the growth of unpaid internships in the voluntary sector

Sally Kosky, National Officer, UNITE the union writes:

Unite is calling for an end to unpaid internships in the voluntary sector and the re-introduction of paid entry level jobs.

 

Our report ‘Unpaid Internships in the Voluntary Sector’ demonstrates that unpaid internships are on the increase. They are becoming the fastest growing source of abuse under the National Minimum Wage regulations. Unpaid internships aren’t just wrong but in many cases they are illegal. Under employment law, people who work set hours, do set tasks and contribute value to an organisation are “workers” and are entitled to the National Minimum Wage but many employers in the voluntary sector are paying their interns nothing.

 

We need your help to stop this, and to help the thousands of unpaid interns. Click here to sign your support to this campaign and tell us how your organisation treats interns.

 

We are also strongly urging all reasonable employers who care about their workers to sign up to a voluntary code that pledges they will end unpaid internships and pay all interns at least the National Minimum Wage. Please ask your employer to sign up to this pledge which you can view here.

 

Young People can do great things – CSV Poster Design competition

News of a poster design competition from the charity Community Service Volunteers [CSV], which happily doesn’t forget, but is rooted in its own history.

Young people can do great things…

CSV launch poster design competition to champion young people


This spring, young people are being challenged to show off their artistic talents in a poster design competition – #giveachance – run by the charity CSV (Community Service Volunteers).


The competition revives a nationwide poster competition run by the charity in 1984, which carried the strapline:  Young people can do great things… if you give us a chance.


Keeping the original 1984 strapline, we want 2013’s generation of young people to show us their artistic talents by designing their own posters, championing young people and the great things they are capable of achieving.


As in 1984 young people are under attack. The increase in tuition fees, the prevalent culture of unpaid internships, and sky-high youth unemployment all make it hard for young people to shine.


CSV has always worked with young people to highlight their unique contributions to society, from its Springboard projects helping young people into work and training, to providing volunteering opportunities to help others.


Entering is simple. We’re inviting people to tweet their designs mentioning @CSV_UK and using the hashtag #giveachance, or upload to Facebook mentioning CSV’s page (www.facebook.com/CSVUK). Alternatively designs can be emailed to web@csv.org.uk


Catherine Flood, Curator of Prints at the Victoria and Albert Museum and author of British Posters: Advertising, Art and Activism, will select the winning competition entry and all entries will be displayed on the CSV #giveachance Pinterest board. The winning and commended designs will be displayed at a special exhibition at Springboard Hackney, and the winner will also receive a signed copy of British Posters.


The competition launches on Monday 13th May 2013 and closes at midnight on 10th June 2013.


About the campaign:

The poster competition is part of CSV’s ‘Volunteer Champions’ campaign, celebrating the role volunteers play in changing lives everyday across the UK.


How you can get involved:

Please show your support for the CSV #giveachance competition by writing about is on your blog or encouraging your social media followers by either tweeting on Twitter using the hashtag #giveachance or sharing our campaign on your Facebook timeline.


For more information visitwww.csv.org.uk/postercompetition

For competition promotional images please visit our dropbox folder.

Contact:

For more information or images please contact Alice Haworth-Booth

      Email: alicehb@gmail.com

      Tel: 07854928926