APPG Inquiry into Youth Work

IDYW encourages everyone to reply to this inquiry. We will submit a response grounded in the IDYW cornerstones and in our REVIVING YOUTH WORK AND REIMAGINING A YOUTH SERVICE : STARTING POINTS paper, which grew out of the series of ‘Is the Tide Turning?’ events and discussions at our 2018 national conference.

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NYA is pleased to open this All Party Parliamentary Group inquiry into Youth Work

 

The National Youth Agency (NYA) is delighted to support the All Party Parliamentary Group for Youth Affairs (APPG) to lead a full national inquiry into youth work. The APPG Members of Parliament are inviting organisations from across England to submit evidence to the inquiry team, led by the NYA, to inform the analysis and findings of the inquiry. We aim to gather as much evidence as possible, from as many youth work projects, settings and practitioners as we can, as well as young people themselves. The NYA is grateful to the cross-party group of MP’s who will lead this inquiry and special thanks also to the APPG secretariat British Youth Council and YMCA England & Wales for supporting this endeavour.

Please promote this inquiry to help us gather a strong and robust evidence base for youth work and the impact it makes. This is a rare opportunity for the sector and we encourage all organisations and individuals in the sector to contribute.

Youth work can make a crucial difference to young people’s lives in their personal and social development. It can build their confidence and skills, promote equality, challenge discrimination, and champion the positive place for young people in society.

Please click here to download a printable brief.

Call for Evidence

NYA is collecting evidence from the sector to inform the following four questions until the 20th June 2018.

  1. What is the role of youth work in addressing the needs and opportunities for young people?
  2. Are the key issues and challenges faced by young people being addressed by current youth service provisions?
  3. Are there sufficient youth workers to support youth services and other delivery models for good quality youth work?
  4. What are the training and workforce development needs to secure and sustain youth work?

Nominate your youth work for a visit from MPs

As part of the consultation process, MPs will be visiting youth sector organisations/services nationwide.

IMPORTANT – to submit your evidence or to arrange a possible MP’s visit you will need to register with NYA and open an account – sort this out via https://nya.org.uk/appg-inquiry/

Frontier Trust Inclusion Statement

James Ballantyne informs us:

In one way this is ‘only’ a statement, but as a statement of intent, and making a position public, this is quite a stand by FYT as a faith-based organisation. I stand with them, and with the communities of people who have been oppressed by society, misunderstood and also received the same treatment by churches.

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NEW INCLUSION STATEMENT RELEASED

THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT WAS ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF FRONTIER YOUTH TRUST IN MAY 2018:

“Frontier Youth Trust is a home for pioneer youth work. We are a prophetic movement on the margins, calling and working for shalom in and through the lives of young people.

“Frontier Youth Trust is passionately committed to equality. As such, we will seek to embrace and champion those who are often marginalised in Christian communities and the wider world, regardless of economic power, age, gender, gender identity, mental health, mental ability, physical ability, race or sexuality. As an organisation and a movement, we will be proactive in affirming all as fearfully and wonderfully made in the image of God.

“We recognise that we don’t always get this right. We can be unaware of our own prejudices, and we have not always been vocal enough about the things we stand for. At such times we will humbly seek forgiveness, and seek to make right what has been wrong. We will work to eliminate discriminatory behaviour wherever it is found and educate those who show prejudice, as we pursue a better world for young people.”

The Ten Minute Bill and a problematic PMQ?

 

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I’m probably illustrating how out of touch I am, but I continue to disagree with the line taken by Lloyd in his question to Teresa May. Arguing for a Youth Service on the grounds that an alarming number of young people have felt suicidal or that knife and gang crime is rising does not offer, in my opinion, a convincing and sustainable basis for renewing universal, open access, informal education provision, which remains valuable in its own right, whilst being humble about its part in tackling social dilemmas rooted deeply in an alienating and exploitative society.

Ironically May’s weak response would have been rendered even weaker if Lloyd had at least mentioned the precarious future visited upon young people by the Tories’ policies.

 

Lloyd Russell-Moyle (Brighton, Kemptown) (Lab/Co-op)

Q7. Last year, a quarter of young people thought about suicide, and one in nine attempted suicide. Young people are three times more likely to be lonely than older people. Knife crime is up, and gang crime is up. There are fewer opportunities for young people than ever before—68% of our youth services ​have been cut since 2010—with young people having nowhere to go, nothing to do and no one to speak to. Is it now time for a statutory youth service, and will the Prime Minister support my ten-minute rule Bill after Prime Minister’s questions? [905633]

The Prime Minister
I think “Nice try” is the answer to the hon. Gentleman, but he said that there were fewer opportunities for young people here in this country. May I just point out to him the considerable improvement there has been in the opportunities for young people to get into work and the way in which we have seen youth unemployment coming down?

Some more photos from Facebook of the great turnout at the Palace of Varieties, to borrow a phrase from Denis Skinner.

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Mapping Open Access Youth Work : Join the IDYW Collective Exercise

Ta to unravellingthemind.co.uk

Every now and then, someone on the In Defence of Youth Work Facebook page brings up the subject of mapping youth provision around the country. So now we have decided to try to do this, using our greatest resource – you (cue motivational cheers). This involves everyone with knowledge of open access provision around their area to drop pins onto a google maps shared document, accessed here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1h5AIffHOKF1at5HeDQuA32Uo9dA&usp=sharing

Open the Youthclubsmap file for detailed information about how to join the exercise.

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Feedback, suggestions warmly welcomed.

Thanks to Colin Brent for initiating this exercise in collaboration.

Sustenance for the Senses 4 – PAR, PYJ, Austerity, Families and Democracy

Very interesting thread on Facebook about Participatory Action Research [PAR] sparked by Lucy Hill’s opener, full of recommended links, the offer by Roy Smith of an initial meeting of interested parties and the chance of an IDYW seminar on PAR in the Autumn. Will keep my fingers crossed. Have a look.

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Ta to IDS

Hi, I will soon be carrying out a dissertation on ‘Co-creating a community space with young people through participatory action research’. I am in the lucky position that we have secured funding for a purpose-built youth centre so the research will feed directly into this.

I will be exploring the concepts of participation, community and asset-based community development but can anyone recommend some key reading around PAR with young people?


 

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A new article from Steve Case and Kevin Haines, our friends at Positive Youth Justice, in Crime Prevention and Community Safety: An International Journal.

Transatlantic ‘Positive Youth Justice’: a distinctive new model for responding to offending by children?

This paper examines the origins, main features, guiding principles and underpinning evidence bases of the different versions of positive youth justice developed in England/Wales (Children First, Offenders Second) and the USA (Positive Youth Justice Model) and their respective critiques of negative and child-friendly forms of youth justice. Comparing and contrasting these two versions enables an evaluation of the extent to which positive youth justice presents as a coherent and coordinated transatlantic ‘movement’, as opposed to disparate critiques of traditional youth justice with limited similarities.

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BRITAIN’S BIG SQUEEZE

The New York Times comments via the Daily Telegraph: Well worth reading in full.

In Britain, Austerity Is Changing Everything

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Parts of central Liverpool that were rebuilt to attract tourists stand alongside largely neglected areas. credit Andrea Bruce for The New York Times

After eight years of budget cutting, Britain is looking less like the rest of Europe and more like the United States, with a shrinking welfare state and spreading poverty.

PRESCOT, England — A walk through this modest town in the northwest of England amounts to a tour of the casualties of Britain’s age of austerity.

The old library building has been sold and refashioned into a glass-fronted luxury home. The leisure centre has been razed, eliminating the public swimming pool. The local museum has receded into town history. The police station has been shuttered.

Now, as the local government desperately seeks to turn assets into cash, Browns Field, a lush park in the centre of town, may be doomed, too. At a meeting in November, the council included it on a list of 17 parks to sell to developers.

“Everybody uses this park,” says Jackie Lewis, who raised two children in a red brick house a block away. “This is probably our last piece of community space. It’s been one after the other. You just end up despondent.”

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Roy Smith is running a workshop on Family and Democracy in London on the 9th June as part of AntiUniversity 2018. He says it would be great to hear from people interested in political education and how families might work together for political and social change.

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How do we learn about democracy? The biggest influence on most young people’s political views and behaviours are those of their parents and community. Many people feel let down by politicians creating negative experiences, alienating them from democratic processes that should exist to help them. This leads to apathy and conclusions like ‘they are all as bad as each other’ or ‘nothing ever changes’. I am researching how families could improve learning about democracy and lead social change together.

The first part of this workshop will be a chance to discuss some of the challenges and inequalities in our political system, sharing experiences and opinions on political education as well as imagining how things could be better.

We will then be experimenting with photovoice, a research method that uses photography to answer questions, to explore how political decision-making impacts on physical spaces, the family and everyday life. This may involve going outside and using camera phones to capture images.

It’s a free event, but please book a place on Eventbrite if interested. If you look at http://www.antiuniversity.org there are loads more events going on over 2 weeks. Sadly this is the last year, but it would be good to make it a great one.
https://www.facebook.com/events/176787719693906/?ti=cl

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Arguing and organising for a Statutory Youth Service continued

Article: Winning a Statutory Youth Service

Doug-Nicholls

Doug Nicholls reflects on the momentous Roundtable event which took place at the Palace of Westminster on 23rd April 2018. He posits that there are shifts towards a new Youth Service with support from key politicians, youth organisations and young people. Setting the political and economic context, Nicholls suggests how a new youth service if both needed and affordable.

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CHOOSEYOUTH EVENT:

CREATING A STATUTORY YOUTH SERVICE – TEN MINUTE BILL

6 June at 10:00–14:00 at Portcullis House (The MacMillan Room), SW1A 2JR London

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June 6th is an important day for the future of youth work and youth services.

On that day Lloyd Russell Moyle will speak to a Bill in Parliament seeking to introduce a statutory youth service to enhance open access provision and secure resourcing for our essential work.

It is vital that young people and youth workers are in Parliament on that day to meet their MPs.

We, therefore, ask you to consider coming to Parliament where we have booked a large room in Portcullis House (The MacMillan Room).

The idea is to invite your MP to meet you there at a specific time between 10.00-14.00pm.

If you are not able to meet your MP for any reason please consider coming along yourself and supporting the day and keep the great momentum going and meet people from all over the country.

Because of Parliamentary security and access arrangements, you will need to sign up for this event. Once you have done this then we will be in touch to find out the times of your arrival and departure on the day.

This could be a day that really changes things just before the All Party Parliamentary Group enquiry into the youth service over the summer so please get in touch with your MPs as soon as possible.

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