Beyond Brexit: The Impact of Leaving the EU on the Youth Work Sector

Y&P

A challenging piece from Annette and Sinéad on at least two levels.

  1. Our own ‘is the tide turning?’ discussion paper ignores Brexit. Why?
  2. They continue to suggest that many of us, despite our claim to be reimagining the future, are hampered by a fear of the unknown.

We should seek to address these criticisms in next month’s debates.

The UK having voted to leave the EU, Annette Coburn and Sinéad Gormally consider potential problems and possibilities for youth work within post-Brexit Britain, with a focus on Scotland in particular. They outline how youth work has reached a ‘tipping point’ in its evolution, where austerity measures have consistently undermined it. They examine the potential impact of the further loss of EU funding. Recognising that it is entirely uncharted territory, they assert that despite the inherent concerns, Brexit could also be a catalyst for re-imagining youth work as a creative and resistant practice within social and informal education.

Beyond Brexit: The Impact of Leaving the EU on the Youth Work Sector

A Collective Chance to be Self-Critical – see you in Brum on the 30th

Logo IDYW

IN DEFENCE OF YOUTH WORK 7th NATIONAL CONFERENCE

BLURRING THE BOUNDARIES OR RE-IMAGINING YOUTH WORK?

BIRMINGHAM SETTLEMENT, ASTON, BIRMINGHAM [Directions]

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 from 11.15 – 4.30

 

Back in April we postponed our national conference as a number of other broad initiatives were on the go. We said at the time we hoped our rearranged conference would keep the debate about the future alive and ongoing. Our themes, ‘Blurring the Boundaries?’ and ‘Re-Imagining Youth Work?’ raise questions for In Defence of Youth Work. and the youth sector as a whole.

 

Programme

11.15 Where is IDYW up to? What is its role?

11.30 Challenging IDYW’s perspective, ‘Thinking the Unthinkable’ – Annette Coburn [University of West Scotland] and Sinead Gormally [University of Hull] with a response from Tania de St Croix [IDYW] followed by open discussion.

12.40 Paul Fenton will share the major themes arising from the Shaping the Future events held by the Professional Association of Lecturers in YCW followed by open discussion.

1.30 Lunch – bring your own snap as per tradition or there are local shops.

2.15 Where are people working? How is youth work surviving? Kirsty Lowrie  [Aspire Arts] and Malcolm Ball [IDYW] will lead off a dialogue in small groups about the state of play on the ground.

3.45 Where do we go from here? Dependent on how the day unfolds we will have a Q&A panel session or break into local/regional groups.

Tea, coffee etc will be available.

Conference fee is a minimum of £10 waged, £5 students/unwaged.

To book a place contact Rachel@yasy.co.uk

Please circulate the flyers

idywsept30 – Word flyer

idywsept30 – pdf flyer

Immediate Opportunities at the University of West Scotland

UWS

Message from Annette Coburn

Anyone interested in studying for a BA (Hons) in Community Education at University of West Scotland?
OR
knows someone who might be interested?
We still have a few funded places (subject to eligibility) for our Sept. intake….just click on the link below for info and to apply via UCAS! Feel free to share this link if you feel able!

http://www.uws.ac.uk/bacommunityeducation/

And if you already have a degree and are looking for a new challenge… then our new MSc in Critical Youth and Community Studies is starting in September too.

http://www.uws.ac.uk/postgraduate/critical_youth_and_community_studies/

 

 

IDYW 7th National Conference, September 30 in Birmingham

IN DEFENCE OF YOUTH WORK 7th NATIONAL CONFERENCE

BLURRING THE BOUNDARIES OR RE-IMAGINING YOUTH WORK?

BIRMINGHAM SETTLEMENT, ASTON, BIRMINGHAM

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 from 11.00 – 4.30

 

Back in April we postponed our national conference as a number of other broad initiatives were on the go, notably UK Youth with its concept of the Social Journey, the Training Agencies Group ‘shaping the future of youth work’ and ChooseYouth. We said at the time we hoped our rearranged conference would keep the debate about the future alive and ongoing. In this spirit we are holding our event on Friday, September 30 in Birmingham. Our themes, ‘Blurring the Boundaries?’ and ‘Re-Imagining Youth Work?’ raise questions for In Defence of Youth Work. and the youth sector as a whole.

 

In the morning session Annette Coburn and Sinead Gormally will challenge our emphasis on the voluntary relationship as a cornerstone of youth work’s distinctiveness, suggesting that IDYW’s position is an obstacle to ’thinking the unthinkable’, to the potential of reinventing youth work across professional boundaries. This challenging critique will be followed, after group discussion, by a report by Paul Fenton of the Training Agencies Group on the major themes arising from its series of conferences on ‘Shaping the Future’, particularly the impact of the changing landscape on the character of professional training.

 

In the afternoon we will seek to draw on your sense of what is happening on the ground. What sort of youth work are you involved in? What is your perspective on the future? This debate will be catalysed by a couple of inputs from projects such as Aspire Arts, which are charting different ways of keeping youth work alive. We wonder whether this sharing of your experience and your differing work situations might be the first step in mapping the diversity of provision brought about by the dramatic change in the economy of youth work.

 

In a final panel session involving amongst others, the Institute of Youth Work, ChooseYouth and UK Youth, we will grapple with the dilemmas of how we can cooperate rather than compete and how we can retain our integrity within a political climate, which favours conformity and compliance and funds accordingly.?

 

Further details to follow – confirming programme, speakers etc…

 

As for lunch, please bring your own as is our tradition.

 

Conference fee is a minimum of £10 waged, £5 students/unwaged.

 

To book a place contact Rachel@yasy.co.uk

 

Please circulate the PDF flyer – Conference2016Flyer1

PhD Projects: Youth work in schools and Volunteering in communities

In the run up to our conference the issues of what constitutes youth work and the significance of volunteering remain central. In this context, courtesy of Annette Coburn, notice of two PhD opportunities designed to shed more light on proceedings.

Youth work in schools – connecting across boundaries in formal and informal education (PHDED002)

For at least some of us a number of assumptions in the outline of the research prompt caution.

Research has shown that when young people routinely excluded from school, engaged in youth work, they were able to achieve positive outcomes (Finlay et al. 2010, 2013). This study concluded that the infrastructure and focus on content and product in schools – which work well for many young people – do not work for all young people. This raises a question about what we do for young people for whom schooling is not working. 

The position of youth work in Scotland has been strengthened by bringing it into statute (Scottish Govt., 2013) and by integrating it into core education policy, as part of Curriculum for Excellence, which seeks ‘to build and strengthen effective partnerships between schools and youth work’ (Education Scotland, 2013, p.1). This brings opportunities for new collaborative practices in schools. This study seeks to generate new knowledge and understanding of the potentialities for youth work in schools by asking young people, teachers and youth workers about their experiences and their perceptions on the impacts these bring. 

Built on the concept of curriculum as process, ‘the focus of educational youth work is concerned with the processes which young people negotiate in order to grow in personal and social development’ (Milburn et al.1995, p.9) It is anticipated that, rather than pathologising young people who do not achieve in school, analysis will construct an asset based model for integrating youth work with school education. 

All of which renders the research project challenging and intriguing.

The impact of volunteering on communities (PHDED006)

The idea of volunteering, giving something back to a community or worthwhile cause, has underpinned philanthropic interests in the UK for over 100 years. While research has shown individual benefits to volunteers and beneficiaries (Dekker & Halman, 2003; Piliavin, 2003; Wilson & Musick, 2000), little is known about the collective impact of volunteering on communities. This is an area of importance because it has been estimated that approximately twenty two million people volunteer in the UK every year (Hudson, 2006) while voluntary involvement in governance and citizenship roles suggests a direct relationship between deep participation and feelings of connectedness and social integration (Dinham, 2007). 
This study will examine why people volunteer in order to consider their motivations for volunteering in community contexts. It will focus on how volunteering might help to build community connectedness and social cohesion in four to eight case settings. The extent to which volunteering contributes to the social economy and can enhance feelings of well-being and human flourishing will be analysed. 
To gain deep understanding of potential impacts, the research will examine different case sites, in rural and urban locations and will examine the widest possible variation in volunteering experience. For example, areas identified as experiencing high levels of deprivation and poverty will be compared to more affluent communities, and the experiences of different social groups in terms of, for example age, gender or ethnicity, will enable comparisons to be made, and conclusions drawn. The research will involve in-depth analysis of specific cases where volunteering is perceived as making an impact.