Writing the History of Youth in the Modern World, 1800 to the present

It would be great to see contributions on the history of youth work/youth organisations. A few names come to mind.

Writing the History of Youth in the Modern World, 1800 to the present

Friday 26th May 2017, University of Sheffield

history-of-youth

Call For Papers

The lives and experiences of young people have long been a topic of historical interest. This conference seeks to explore how historians understand and represent youth in the modern world, and encourages reflection on the different ways of writing the history of young people. With a growing amount of work in the field, this conference will provide a space for scholars to reflect on current approaches, reinterpret and re-evaluate older approaches and structures, present work that moves beyond the urban experiences of youth, or that adopts transnational approaches, and to question how the lives of young people relate to wider histories.

Topics could include, but are not limited to:

The spaces and places inhabited by youth
Regional or local histories of young people
Youth organisations
The experiences and histories of marginalised or underrepresented youth
Reflections on methodologies or sources
Identities of young people
Sex and relationships
The young person as a consumer

 
Proposals for individual papers of 20 minutes are invited for any topic related to the history of young people in the modern period, loosely defined from 1800- present.

Relevant proposals from outside of the discipline of history are also welcome. Abstracts of 300-350 words should be sent to Sarah Kenny (skenny1@sheffield.ac.uk) by Friday 24th February 2017.

MCYS Presents: Politics of Widening Participation, July 18

This looks very interesting and enticing.

MCYS

The Manchester Centre for Youth Studies and the Centre for Children, Young people and Community, at the Manchester Metropolitan University, invite you to a public lecture by Anna Hickey-Moody, University of Sydney, followed by a launch of Professor Melanie Tebbutt’s new book, ‘Making Youth: A History of Youth in Modern Britain, Palgrave.

Anna Hickey Moody is currently a lecturer in Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney, Australia. She will deliver a lecture reflecting on a study with over 200 young people who have precarious relationships to education and are not currently attending school. The young people in this study belong to a range of socially marginalized demographics across Australia. Largely excluded from educational futures, young people with tenuous relationships to schooling remain an enduring problem for social inclusion agendas. The empirical study which is the focus of this talk, sets out to understand exactly what young people with precarious relationships to education know about further education and how they come to acquire these knowledges.

Melanie Tebbutt is Professor of History at MMU. She has published across a range of themes, including youth and leisure, communities and cultures, families and gender. Melanie’s new book, Making Youth: A History of Youth in Modern Britain, Palgrave, traces the the origins and development of key themes and debates in the history of British youth. In exploring the complex realities of young people’s shifting social and cultural experiences over two centuries, it argues that historical understanding is essential if the social and cultural attitudes which still frequently dismiss or discount young people’s needs are to be challenged. Current issues such as the ageing of western societies, high levels of youth unemployment and the potential for social and political unrest make this a timely study.

Please join us on 18th July 2016 from 5pm-7.30pm in the Benzie Building 403, BZ403, followed by a drinks reception at the Benzie Roof Garden.

Please sign up using the Eventbrite link below.

If you require further details, please contact:

Hannah Smithson: H.L.smithson@mmu.ac.u

Monday, 18 July 2016 from 17:00 to 19:30 (BST) at Manchester Metropolitan University – Benzie Building, BZ403 Higher Ormond St, Manchester, M15 6BG – View Map