Is the tide turning? The IYW offers a strategy and UNITE seeks to resuscitate the JNC

At this moment we are near completing a draft ‘Is the tide turning?’ document based on the discussions at events held around the country late last year. We are going to present a draft for debate at the Youth & Policy conference in Leeds on Friday, February 9th, after which we are going to circulate the paper to all those involved thus far. The draft will then go to the IDYW national conference in Birmingham on Friday, March 9th. Amongst those contributing to the conference will be UNITE and UNISON, together with the Institute for Youth Work.

In this context, it’s informative and revealing to spend time with two new publications from the Institute and UNITE.

 

IYWlogo

STRATEGIC PLAN 2018-2023

The IYW has become a robust and trusted organisation in its own right that has an elected council of 12 dedicated individuals bringing a wealth of skills and experience from across the youth sector. We grew from sector bodies and continue to be a team player, open to working with the wider sector.

We have outlined below our strategic plan that seeks to ensure the place of IYW in the future of youth work as the democratic, independent professional body for youth workers that does not compete with those we seek to represent.

Read in full at IYW STRATEGIC PLAN

Meanwhile UNITE has produced a research report, undertaken by the Yorkshire and Humberside Regional Unit, entitled YOUTH WORK: PROFESSIONALS VALUED.

Find below its key recommendations.

Key recommendations

i. A specific Minister for Youth Affairs whose responsibility is to be an advocate and voice for young people in Government, attending Cabinet. The role would straddle  Government departments and assess the impact of Government policy on the hopes, aspirations and lives of young people.

ii. Government should create a national youth forum to consult young people on policies that affect them, giving them powers to challenge policies that will affect their interests.

iii. Parliament should establish a joint parliamentary commission on youth services to consult with young people, communities and key stakeholders of the sector on the impact loss of or change of provision has had on the lives of young people, communities and key stakeholders and make recommendations for legislative and
other action.

 iv. The introduction of a Statutory Youth Services bill that places new legal duties and obligations on local authorities to provide a professional youth service and meaningfully consult young people on any changes to local services; especially cuts, closures and removal of services.

v. A Parliamentary Select Committee report on the impact of the changes in government policy on youth and community work, with a comparable cost analysis of short term programmes against universal open access provision. This should assess the impact of cuts and policy changes, in order to make recommendations to
government on how to stop the further de-professionalisation of youth and community work.

vi. The UK Government and the Governments of the Devolved Nations where responsibility for youth services sitmust develop a national strategy involving stakeholders to resist further de-professionalisation and retain and return local authority youth service funding to a well-resourced, statutory provision and seeks to protect and preserve the JNC.

vii. The protection of the JNC quality standards through the establishment of a Youth and community workforce licensure system, workforce register including a revocable license to practice, protection of the title, CPD scheme and code of ethics as exists in many other professions.

viii. Stakeholders within the community and youth work sector must develop a communication strategy to educate students on youth and community courses about the JNC.

ix. Stakeholders including the JNC, Trade Unions, ETS committees, Training agency group, plus HEIs and Youth work employers must carry out a national review of local and national training for youth work.

x. Local authority employers must work in partnership with trade union staff side groups to develop policies and procedures to support those workers already redeployed, to maximise their impact in new roles.

 

We look forward to the contributions of both the IYW and UNITE to our conference. What will be fascinating is to explore the question of the relationship in seeking to turn the tide between IYW, UNITE and indeed UNISON? Almost a decade ago at the first IDYW conference held in Manchester, Doug Nicholls, then the long-standing General Secretary of CYWU [UNITE], gave an impassioned speech, warning of the dangers of reviving the idea of a youth workers’ professional association. To what extent have the circumstances and perspectives changed?

 

A Collective Chance to be Self-Critical – see you in Brum on the 30th

Logo IDYW

IN DEFENCE OF YOUTH WORK 7th NATIONAL CONFERENCE

BLURRING THE BOUNDARIES OR RE-IMAGINING YOUTH WORK?

BIRMINGHAM SETTLEMENT, ASTON, BIRMINGHAM [Directions]

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 from 11.15 – 4.30

 

Back in April we postponed our national conference as a number of other broad initiatives were on the go. We said at the time we hoped our rearranged conference would keep the debate about the future alive and ongoing. Our themes, ‘Blurring the Boundaries?’ and ‘Re-Imagining Youth Work?’ raise questions for In Defence of Youth Work. and the youth sector as a whole.

 

Programme

11.15 Where is IDYW up to? What is its role?

11.30 Challenging IDYW’s perspective, ‘Thinking the Unthinkable’ – Annette Coburn [University of West Scotland] and Sinead Gormally [University of Hull] with a response from Tania de St Croix [IDYW] followed by open discussion.

12.40 Paul Fenton will share the major themes arising from the Shaping the Future events held by the Professional Association of Lecturers in YCW followed by open discussion.

1.30 Lunch – bring your own snap as per tradition or there are local shops.

2.15 Where are people working? How is youth work surviving? Kirsty Lowrie  [Aspire Arts] and Malcolm Ball [IDYW] will lead off a dialogue in small groups about the state of play on the ground.

3.45 Where do we go from here? Dependent on how the day unfolds we will have a Q&A panel session or break into local/regional groups.

Tea, coffee etc will be available.

Conference fee is a minimum of £10 waged, £5 students/unwaged.

To book a place contact Rachel@yasy.co.uk

Please circulate the flyers

idywsept30 – Word flyer

idywsept30 – pdf flyer

IDYW 7th National Conference, September 30 in Birmingham

IN DEFENCE OF YOUTH WORK 7th NATIONAL CONFERENCE

BLURRING THE BOUNDARIES OR RE-IMAGINING YOUTH WORK?

BIRMINGHAM SETTLEMENT, ASTON, BIRMINGHAM

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 from 11.00 – 4.30

 

Back in April we postponed our national conference as a number of other broad initiatives were on the go, notably UK Youth with its concept of the Social Journey, the Training Agencies Group ‘shaping the future of youth work’ and ChooseYouth. We said at the time we hoped our rearranged conference would keep the debate about the future alive and ongoing. In this spirit we are holding our event on Friday, September 30 in Birmingham. Our themes, ‘Blurring the Boundaries?’ and ‘Re-Imagining Youth Work?’ raise questions for In Defence of Youth Work. and the youth sector as a whole.

 

In the morning session Annette Coburn and Sinead Gormally will challenge our emphasis on the voluntary relationship as a cornerstone of youth work’s distinctiveness, suggesting that IDYW’s position is an obstacle to ’thinking the unthinkable’, to the potential of reinventing youth work across professional boundaries. This challenging critique will be followed, after group discussion, by a report by Paul Fenton of the Training Agencies Group on the major themes arising from its series of conferences on ‘Shaping the Future’, particularly the impact of the changing landscape on the character of professional training.

 

In the afternoon we will seek to draw on your sense of what is happening on the ground. What sort of youth work are you involved in? What is your perspective on the future? This debate will be catalysed by a couple of inputs from projects such as Aspire Arts, which are charting different ways of keeping youth work alive. We wonder whether this sharing of your experience and your differing work situations might be the first step in mapping the diversity of provision brought about by the dramatic change in the economy of youth work.

 

In a final panel session involving amongst others, the Institute of Youth Work, ChooseYouth and UK Youth, we will grapple with the dilemmas of how we can cooperate rather than compete and how we can retain our integrity within a political climate, which favours conformity and compliance and funds accordingly.?

 

Further details to follow – confirming programme, speakers etc…

 

As for lunch, please bring your own as is our tradition.

 

Conference fee is a minimum of £10 waged, £5 students/unwaged.

 

To book a place contact Rachel@yasy.co.uk

 

Please circulate the PDF flyer – Conference2016Flyer1

The State of Youth Work Today : National Conference, March 8

Please print off and circulate the one side flyer for our fourth national conference – to be found below. It contains the following information.

IN DEFENCE OF YOUTH WORK FOURTH NATIONAL CONFERENCE

FRIDAY, MARCH 8th AT THE BURLEY LODGE CENTRE, LEEDS

‘THE STATE OF YOUTH WORK TODAY’

Starting at 11.00 through to 4.00 sessions will include:

  • The significance of the renaissance of feminist youth work [FeministWebs]

  • Surviving in the training agencies and multi-agency services [Janet Batsleer and Nic Gratton]

  • The illusory pursuit of Outcomes and Well-Being [Tony Taylor and Ian McGimpsey]

  • Accommodating to and Resisting the Targeting Culture [Bernard Davies and Pauline Grace]

Lunch break at 1.15 – please bring your own as is our custom! Drinks provided.

Conference fee is a minimum of £10 for the waged and £5 for students/ the unwaged.

Directions to Burley at http://www.burleylodge.org.uk/homedir/contactus.htm

To book a place and/or obtain more information, contact Tony at tonymtaylor@gmail.com

Follow us at http://www.indefenceofyouthwork.org.uk/wordpress/

March 2013 conference flyer The State of Youth Work Today

Leeds – the place to be for youth and community folk, March 8 – 10

Hinsley Hall

Over the weekend March 8 -10 the Leeds air will reek with talk of practice and policy, politics and history. With not a corporate sponsor in sight, without a blessing from above, a motley collection of folk passionate about youth and community work will be arguing the toss.

Events kick off with our IDYW conference on the Friday, March 8 at the Burley Lodge Centre – see IDYW March 2013 conference flyer – more details soon.

The Youth & Policy History conference follows quickly in its wake and there are still places available. Latest news is that a further addition to the programme is a symposium on ‘Trade Unionism and Youth and Community Work’. Find below the original calling notice.

History of Youth and Community Conference 8th -10th March 2013

We are delighted to report that the next History of Youth and Community Work Conference will be taking place at the Hinsley Hall, Leeds in March 2013. Therefore we would like to take this opportunity to invite you to join us at the seventh History of Youth and Community Work Study Conference organized by the Editorial Board of the Journal Youth and Policy. This like the others is run on a non-profit basis and despite higher residential costs we have managed to avoid any increase in the price for the third time on the trot.

As with the earlier gatherings it will include a mix of plenary sessions, workshops and ‘surprise’ events. Amongst the plenary speakers will be John Coleman, founder of the Trust for the Study of Adolescence who now teaches at Oxford University and is a member of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Bedfordshire. He has written widely on the nature of adolescence and will be talking on the historical origins and development of this concept. A second plenary speaker will be Graham Crow from the University of Southampton a much published author he will be talking on ‘Social solidarity and the dream of community’. To mark the 50 th anniversary of the death of Lily Montagu the pioneer of girls’ and mixed clubs Jean Spence from Durham University will be speaking on her life and contribution.

All delegates will receive a complimentary copy of the forthcoming Essays on the History of Community and Youth Work being published by Russell House in 2013.

For further information please contact Tracey at  conferences@youthandpolicy.org