MMU BA Y&C course under threat! Advice and support appreciated.

The BA [Honours] Youth and Community course at the Manchester Metropolitan University is facing a precarious future. Against this worrying backcloth Janet Batsleer, Reader in Education and Principal Lecturer, Youth and Community, writes to ask our readers the following question.

What would you design into a Community Education course for the future that builds on the learning of the past 40 years or so? Or would you just close it down?

Your replies should be sent to Janet at J.Batsleer@mmu.ac.uk and would be much appreciated.

 

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Tony Taylor, Jon Ord and Janet Batsleer at the IDYW conference

 

These are indeed troubled times.

Still room at the IDYW conference plus can we measure and treasure character?

On Thursday I’m contributing to a Centre for Youth Impact event, ‘The Measure and the Treasure: Evaluation in personal and social development’ in London. It’s sold out. OK, I accept there is unlikely to be a connection. However I will post next week a report of the proceedings and a summary of my sceptical input into the morning panel debate.

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The Measure and the Treasure: Evaluation in personal and social development

The Centre for Youth Impact is hosting a day-long event on the 16th March 2017 focused on issues of measurement and personal and social development.
The day will explore policy, practical and philosophical debates about whether, how and why we should seek to measure the development of social and emotional skills in young people – also referred to as non-cognitive skills, soft skills and character, amongst other terms. We want to structure a thought-provoking and engaging day that introduces participants to a range of ideas and activities. The day will be designed for practitioners working directly with young people, those in an evaluation role, and funders of youth provision.

Speakers and facilitators include: Emma Revie (Ambition), Daniel Acquah (Early Intervention Foundation), Graeme Duncan (Right to Suceed), Robin Bannerjee (University of Sussex), Paul Oginsky (Personal Development Point), Jenny North (Impetus-PEF), Tony Taylor (In Defence of Youth Work), Sarah Wallbank (Yes Futures), Jack Cattell (Get the Data), Mary Darking, Carl Walker and Bethan Prosser (Brighton University), Leonie Elliott-Graves and Chas Mollet (Wac Arts), Tom Ravenscroft (Enabling Enterprise), Phil Sital-Singh (UK Youth) and Luke McCarthy (Think Forward).

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Then on Friday it’s our eighth national conference in Birmingham. To be honest the number of people registering is disappointing, well down on previous years. Although, obviously, the smaller audience, around 30 folk at the moment, will make for intense debate. This said, we’d love to see you there so it’s not too late to register or even turn up on the day.

Youth Work: Educating for good or Preventing the bad?

Details on this Facebook page or at this previous post.

Brighton and Hove’s Youth Services Survive – Blog from Preventing Inequality

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The Pre-Qual Group report from a victorious Brighton and Hove.

Our latest blog post, reflecting on the successful campaign to #protectyouthservices and how we can move forward and build on our momentum.

It begins:

Before we go anywhere in terms of analysing the result of the council’s budget meeting on February the 23rd and discussing how we can move forward, we just want to say well f****** done everybody!!! We all absolutely smashed this campaign, and youth services will survive another year!!!

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It continues:

It is incredibly important that we ask where this money which has been put back into the budget has come from. Most of it will be coming from the Housing Revenue Account, on the basis that those living in council estates are those most likely to benefit from properly funded youth services. The Housing Revenue Account records all revenue expenditure and income from council controlled housing and other services and is essentially a fund to be spent only on housing related services. Given the dire state of much council accommodation in the city (check out ETHRAG, Brighton Housing Coalition and Brighton SolFed for more information on current housing campaigns in the city) it is clear that any money which is diverted from the HRA will limit the council’s ability to deal with the poor conditions rife in council housing and flats. Although the residents of council estates will see a benefit from youth services in terms of things such as the wellbeing of young people, reduced crime and homelessness, a reduction in the HRA will likely have a negative impact on the conditions of the places they live. The issues addressed by youth services are not the same as those addressed by the HRA and as such to say the benefits of one can replace the benefits of the other is simply wrong.

and

At the start of the campaign we called for the council to declare a “no cuts” budget. This is an action for which there is precedent, where the council refuses to set a budget within the funding limits set by central government. Our reasoning for this call was that the proposed cuts in the budget would be unavoidably devastating for many, if not all, of the residents of our city, with cuts going through across the board, from temporary and emergency accommodation to support for disabled adults. We believe these cuts to be shortsighted both economically and socially, and hoped that the proposed cuts to youth services might best illustrate the massive cost to our city of the Conservative government’s enforced cuts to Local Authorities. Fundamentally, we did not believe that any service that provides for the most vulnerable in our communities is more deserving of funding than another, so it would be unfair to take money from one service to fund another. Unfortunately, this call for “no cuts” quickly died as the reality of the situation dictated that such a budget would not occur, and the best we could hope for was mitigating the effects of the proposed cuts to youth services. However, this should be seen as the beginning, not the end, of calls for a “no cuts” budget.

It concludes:

Building a movement

Finally, we believe it is absolutely vital that we begin our planning and our campaigning against cuts to council services as early as possible. One thing which we have taken as a key lesson from the campaign to protect youth services is that by simply reacting to decisions we automatically put ourselves at a disadvantage. Campaigners have maintained this reactive attitude for for too long, merely responding to the latest attack on ordinary people by the political establishment. Instead we must be proactive in building a movement to defend our interests. When the proposed cuts were announced, we found ourselves in a position where we had only a couple of months to put together an effective campaign. By beginning our preparations now and building a strong coalition of groups opposed to cuts across the city we might be able to stop the cuts altogether next year, with a strong ground campaign engaging residents in the issues to gain mass support and building a strong enough case for a “no cuts” budget that the council cannot ignore it. As such, we call on every group which has fought cuts to any and all services to join us in building a movement to end the violent cycle of cuts which are destroying our city and the lives of its residents.

If this campaign to protect youth services has proved one thing, it is that when you organise around a demand which is achievable, have an argument which is strong enough and you pursue that argument with enough persistence and a great enough diversity of tactics, you can achieve concrete success. These were the key elements which won the youth service campaign; saving the service was realistically achievable, the arguments were solid and we simply did not leave the council alone, pursuing every possible avenue available to us, from getting out onto the streets to legally challenging the consultation process. By following this formula we believe that we can be successful in fighting off the cuts again next year, but we can’t do it on our own: we need your help.

Read this challenging and self-critical account  in full at Brighton and Hove’s Youth Services Survive

 

Educating for good? Preventing the bad? Join the debate, March 17

It’s not long to the IDYW national conference on Friday, March 17 in Birmingham. I always get anxious, worrying that nobody will turn up so forgive me encouraging you to think seriously about being with us. It’s always stimulating. Hope to see you there.

Belatedly there’s now an event post on Facebook – see this link below

https://www.facebook.com/events/424051277928371/

PS A few folk have commented that perhaps it’s a long way to come for half a day. In the past we’ve gone for an 11.00 kick off, but never started on time due to travel dilemmas. Hence we’re experimenting with this later starting time and no lunch break. Cheers.

 

Brighton Campaign Protect Youth Services video

As the campaign nears its climax a measured video narrated by Adam Muirhead, which steers clear of simply using the preventative argument. Adam will be contributing to our national conference on March 17.

FEB 23 PYS Protest – Budget Council Meeting 

Hove Town Hall
Norton Road, BN3 2 Hove – 16:00–18:00

Brighton and Hove Council make their final decision about the cuts to the youth service budget at this meeting. This is our final bid to fight for young people’s services – let’s make it a big event. Please join us, share the event and spread the word. Bring your banners and voices – Protect Youth Services!

Guest Blog : Raising Youth Work’s Profile in Warwickshire

Many thanks to Alisdair McCarrick, Youth Worker at the Warwickshire Association of Youth Clubs for these thoughts on how practitioners in the county have sought to raise awareness of youth work’s worth. 

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Warwickshire Youth Services – Raising Our Profile

Context
Like so many youth services across the country Warwickshire has seen its provision in the statutory sector stripped away with a reduced workforce and fewer purpose-built centres in which to offer support to young people. Those staff members who have managed to survive the annual cuts, rounds of redundancies and changes to their job roles continue to operate with a level of passion and commitment that the youth work fraternity will no doubt be familiar with.

Rallying Cry
It was against this backdrop of budget cuts with further such cuts expected that Warwickshire County Council youth workers decided that now was the time to highlight the immense worth of youth work and its unique ability to build and maintain relationships with vulnerable and often emotionally complex young people in order to give them the guidance and support that would improve their prospects of a better future. Local authority youth workers decided to reach out to colleagues across sectors asking them to provide case studies highlighting how the ‘youth work approach’ has helped the lives of individual young people in ways that no other agency or professional is capable of.

Process
Colleagues from WCC, WAYC, Wellesbourne Youth Club and WCYP came together to share their stories in the hope that this would help to motivate us a workforce in order to continue supporting children, young people and families in what has become an increasingly challenging working environment. Bernard Davies from the In Defence of Youth Work campaign helped to facilitate discussions and promote the impact of the ‘youth work approach’ to working with children and young people.

Once shared our anecdotes were then typed up and printed into a booklet called ‘Youth Work Stories’ which was circulated within our professional networks and handed out at a full cabinet meeting at Warwickshire Council during which elected members were discussing the next round of public spending cuts. This was an ideal opportunity to raise awareness about the value of youth work to young people, their families and wider society.

Follow Up
Going forward we now have a regular mailshot that goes to a variety of stakeholders including councillors updating them on new youth work success stories and we have also booked to speak at the full cabinet meeting later this year in order to encourage members to consider how the value of our work.

Perspective
There is no doubt that those of us who trained in youth and community work are practising very differently to the ways we are used to and that we would be most comfortable with but despite this our values and commitment to young people continue to ensure that, against all odds, we are uniquely positioned to build relationships with young people that have an immensely positive impact on their lives.

The booklet – Youth Work Stories – Warwick District

Interestingly too Alisdair’s blog touches implicitly in his observation that “there is no doubt that those of us who trained in youth and community work are practising very differently to the ways we are used to and that we would be most comfortable with” upon the issues at the heart of the forthcoming IDYW national conference on Friday, March 17 in Birmingham – YOUTH WORK: EDUCATING FOR GOOD OR PREVENTING THE BAD? 

We hope very much to see both Alasdair and your good selves at this opportunity to kick around together the dilemmas.

Regional Seminar,’Space in Youth Work’, February 24

Flyer for the above event. More details soon re Oldham and Brighton.

STOP PRESS 

IDYW regional seminar is confirmed for Oldham on Friday 24th Feb – 11-2pm
at http://mahdloyz.org
Egerton Street, Oldham OL13SE

Tracy Ramsey Lhu advises: Please just email me to confirm and we will make sure there is a brew for you ramseyt@hope.ac.uk
Everyone welcome – please share far and wide.

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